The Holly Family

hollyAmerican Holly

Scientific Name: Ilex opaca
Location: Eastern United States
Dried Weight: 40lbs/ft3
Janka Hardness: 1,020lbf
Crushing Strength: 5,5540lbf /in2

Holly has a uniform pale white color with virtually no visible grain pattern. The grain is interlocked to irregular and it has a medium to fine uniform texture. The wood gives off a moderate natural lustre. The end grain is diffuse-porous or semi-ring-porous. Holly is rated as non-durable to perishable in regards to decay. It can be tricky to work with due to the many knots and interlocked grain. It glues, stains, turns, and finishes well.

 

cape-hollyCape Holly

Scientific Name: Ilex mitis
Location: Africa
Dried Weight: 40lbs/ft3
Janka Hardness: 1,100lbf
Crushing Strength: 6,020lbf /in2

Holly has a uniform pale white color with virtually no visible grain pattern. The grain is interlocked to irregular and it has a medium to fine uniform texture. The wood gives off a moderate natural lustre. The end grain is diffuse-porous or semi-ring-porous. Holly is rated as non-durable to perishable in regards to decay. It can be tricky to work with due to the many knots and interlocked grain. It glues, stains, turns, and finishes well.

 

english-holly-sEnglish Holly

Scientific Name: Ilex aquifolium
Location: Europe, northwest Africa, and southeast Asia
Dried Weight: 41lbs/ft3
Janka Hardness: 1,000lbf
Crushing Strength: not available

Holly has a uniform pale white color with virtually no visible grain pattern. The grain is interlocked to irregular and it has a medium to fine uniform texture. The wood gives off a moderate natural lustre. The end grain is diffuse-porous or semi-ring-porous. Holly is rated as non-durable to perishable in regards to decay. It can be tricky to work with due to the many knots and interlocked grain. It glues, stains, turns, and finishes well.

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