The Ebony Family

AfricanEbonyAfrican Ebony

Scientific Name: Diospyros crassiflora
Location: Equatorial West Africa
Dried Weight: 60lbs/ft3
Janka Hardness: 3,000lbf
Crushing Strength: 11,000lbf /in2

African Ebony has a heartwood that is usually jet black. The grain is straight and it has a fine even texture. The wood gives off a high natural lustre. The end grain is diffuse-porous. The wood is rated as very durable in regards to decay. African Ebony is difficult to work on due to its density and dulling effect on cutters. The high oil content in the wood can cause problems with gluing. The wood finishes well and polishes to a nice high lustre. It also responds well to steam bending.

 

black-and-white-ebonyBlack and White Ebony

Scientific Name: Diospyros malabarica
Location: Laos and Southeast Asia
Dried Weight: 51lbs/ft3
Janka Hardness: 1,780lbf
Crushing Strength: not available

Black and White Ebony has a heartwood with a pale straw color and darker black streaks. The sapwood is a paler white color. The grain is generally straight and it has a fine uniform texture. The wood gives off a good natural lustre. The end grain is diffuse-porous. The wood works and turns well.

 

brown-ebonyBrown Ebony

Scientific Name: Caesalpinia spp.
Location: semi-arid regions of South America
Dried Weight: 72lbs/ft3
Janka Hardness: 3,600lbf
Crushing Strength: 11,775lbf /in2

Brown Ebony has a heartwood that is dark brown in color while the sapwood is pale yellow in color. The grain is straight to irregular or interlocked and it has a uniform medium to coarse texture. The wood gives off a moderate natural lustre. The end grain is diffuse-porous. Brown Ebony is rated very durable in regards to decay. The wood is difficult to work with because of its high density and irregular grain. This wood is well suited for a lathe and turns and finishes well.

 

ceylon-ebonyCeylon Ebony

Scientific Name: Diospyros ebenum
Location: southeast Asia
Dried Weight: 57lbs/ft3
Janka Hardness: 2,400lbf
Crushing Strength: 9,225lbf /in2

Ceylon Ebony has a heartwood that is jet black and a sapwood that is a pale yellow. The grain is typically straight and it has a fine uniform texture. The wood gives off a high level natural lustre. The end grain is diffuse-porous. Ceylon Ebony is rated as very durable in regards to decay. The wood is difficult to work with because of its density and strong blunting effect. The wood is difficult to glue on account of the woods oil content. It turns superbly and can be rubbed to a very high natural polish.

 

macassar-ebony1Macassar Ebony

Scientific Name: Diospyros celebica
Location: southeast Asia
Dried Weight: 72lbs/ft3
Janka Hardness: 3,225lbf
Crushing Strength: not available

Macassar Ebony has a dramatic striped appearance with a light to reddish brown body with darker brown or black stripes. The grain is usually straight but sometimes interlocked and it has a very fine uniform texture. Macassar is rated as very durable in regards to decay. The wood is difficult to work with due to its density and interlocked grain. It has a blunting effect on cutters but it does have excellent turning properties.

 

mun-ebonyMun Ebony

Scientific Name: Diospyros mun
Location: Laos and Vietnam
Dried Weight: 67lbs/ft3
Janka Hardness: 3,010lbf
Crushing Strength: not available

Mun Ebony has a heartwood with a medium brown body and dark brown to black streaks. The sapwood is a pale yellow to a white color. The grain is straight and it has a very fine uniform texture. The wood gives a high natural lustre. The end grain is diffuse-porous. Mun Ebony is difficult to work with because of its high density. It also has difficulties gluing because of its oil content. The wood turns and finishes superbly.

 

texas-ebonyTexas Ebony

Scientific Name: Ebenopsis ebano
Location: southern Texas and eastern Mexico
Dried Weight: 60lbs/ft3
Janka Hardness: 2,500lbf
Crushing Strength: not available

Texas Ebony has a heartwood that is a dark reddish brown to a nearly black color. The sapwood is a pale yellow. The grain can be irregular or wild and it has a fine uniform texture. The wood gives off a very good natural lustre. The end grain is diffuse-porous. Texas Ebony is rated as very durable in regards to decay. The wood is difficult to work with because of its high density. It turns superbly and can polish to a very nice high natural polish.

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