The Elm Family

american-elmAmerican Elm

Scientific Name: Ulmus americana
Location: Eastern to Midwest United States
Dried Weight: 35lbs/ft3
Janka Hardness: 830lbf
Crushing Strength: 5,500lbf /in2

American Elm has a heartwood that is light to medium brown in color. The sapwood is a pale white or cream color. The grain is sometimes straight but commonly interlocked and it has a medium texture. The end grain is ring-porous. American Elm is rated as moderately durable to non-durable in regards to decay. It is challenging to work with because of its interlocked grain. It glues, stains, and finishes well. As well it responds well to steam bending.

 

cedar-elmCedar Elm

Scientific Name: Ulmus crassifolia
Location: South-central North America
Dried Weight: 41lbs/ft3
Janka Hardness: 1,325lbf
Crushing Strength: 6,025lbf /in2

Cedar Elm has a heartwood that is light to medium brown and a sapwood that is pale white or cream color. The grain is sometimes straight but commonly interlocked and it has a medium texture. Cedar Elm is rated as moderately durable to non-durable in regards to decay. It can be a challenge to work with because of its interlocked grain. It stains, glues, and finishes well. It also responds well to steam bending.

 

dutchelmDutch Elm

Scientific Name: Ulmus × hollandica
Location: Europe
Dried Weight: 36lbs/ft3
Janka Hardness: 850lbf
Crushing Strength: 4,640lbf /in2

Dutch Elm has a heartwood has a light to medium brown color and a sapwood that is a pale white or cream color. The grain is sometimes straight but commonly interlocked and it has a medium texture. The end grain is ring-porous. Dutch Elm is rated as moderately durable to non-durable in regards to decay. It is challenging to work with because of its interlocked grain. It glues, stains, and finishes well. As well it responds well to steam bending.

 

english-elm-sEnglish Elm

Scientific Name: Ulmus procera
Location: Western Europe
Dried Weight: 36lbs/ft3
Janka Hardness: 800lbf
Crushing Strength: 4,550lbf /in2

English Elm has a heartwood that is light to medium brown in color. The sapwood is a pale white or cream color. The grain is sometimes straight but commonly interlocked and it has a medium texture. The end grain is ring-porous. English Elm is rated as moderately durable to non-durable in regards to decay. It is challenging to work with because of its interlocked grain. It glues, stains, and finishes well. As well it responds well to steam bending.

 

red-elmRed Elm

Scientific Name: Ulmus rubra
Location: Eastern to Midwest United States
Dried Weight: 38lbs/ft3
Janka Hardness: 860lbf
Crushing Strength: 6,360lbf /in2

Red Elm has a heartwood that is light to medium brown in color. The sapwood is a pale white or cream color. The grain is sometimes straight but commonly interlocked and it has a medium texture. The end grain is ring-porous. Red Elm is rated as moderately durable to non-durable in regards to decay. It is challenging to work with because of its interlocked grain. It glues, stains, and finishes well. As well it responds well to steam bending.

 

rock-elmRock Elm

Scientific Name: Ulmus thomasii
Location: Midwestern United States
Dried Weight: 47lbs/ft3
Janka Hardness: 1,300lbf
Crushing Strength: 7,050lbf /in2

Rock Elm has a heartwood that is light to medium brown and a sapwood that is pale white or cream color. The grain is sometimes straight but commonly interlocked and it has a medium texture. Rock Elm is rated as moderately durable to non-durable in regards to decay. It can be a challenge to work with because of its interlocked grain. It stains, glues, and finishes well. It also responds well to steam bending.

 

winged-elmWinged Elm

Scientific Name: Ulmus alata
Location: Southern and south-central United States
Dried Weight: 42lbs/ft3
Janka Hardness: 1,500lbf
Crushing Strength: 6,780lbf /in2

Winged Elm has a heartwood that is light to medium brown in color. The sapwood is a pale white or cream color. The grain is sometimes straight but commonly interlocked and it has a medium texture. The end grain is ring-porous. Winged Elm is rated as moderately durable to non-durable in regards to decay. It is challenging to work with because of its interlocked grain. It glues, stains, and finishes well. As well it responds well to steam bending.

 

wych-elm-sWych Elm

Scientific Name: Ulmus glabra
Location: Europe
Dried Weight: 38lbs/ft3
Janka Hardness: 990lbf
Crushing Strength: 6,700lbf /in2

Wych Elm has a heartwood that is light to medium brown in color. The sapwood is a pale white or cream color. The grain is sometimes straight but commonly interlocked and it has a medium texture. The end grain is ring-porous. Wych Elm is rated as moderately durable to non-durable in regards to decay. It is challenging to work with because of its interlocked grain. It glues, stains, and finishes well. As well it responds well to steam bending.

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